One advert shows a father talking about his son who is staying up late playing what appears to be a fantasy video game in the sitting room. Pinterest. The British Army has raised eyebrows with its new recruitment campaign, targeting "snowflakes," "phone zombies," and "selfie addicts", among other stereotypical images of millennials. The army’s new campaign targets 16-to-25-year-old “snowflake millennials” who feel they need a “bigger sense of purpose”, according to British army officer Paul Nanson. The new recruitment advertising campaign, titled ‘Your Army Needs You’, launches on January 3 with a series of adverts on TV and the internet as well as billboard posters. In the year to 1 October 2018, 12,130 passed basic training but 14,760 left the army. British Army; T he ‘Snowflake generation’ recruitment adverts have seen the number of applications to join the Army almost double, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) has revealed. ... 4 August 2014. The campaign, featuring posters and TV ads titled Your Army Needs You, suggests that what is seen as a weakness or a character flaw by the rest of society can be seen as a strength by the army. Hide Comments Show Comments. The recruitment campaign comes as the army failed to meet recruitment targets as it “underestimated the complexity of what it was trying to achieve” when it embarked on a project with outsourcing giant Capita, according to a National Audit Office report in December. Create a commenting name to join the debate, There are no Independent Premium comments yet - be the first to add your thoughts, There are no comments yet - be the first to add your thoughts. One poster reads: “Snowflakes, your army needs you and your compassion”. Explore our Digital Marketing Strategy and Planning Toolkit. Fall in, you ’orrible little snowflakes! The campaign divided commentators and controversy has been fueled by soldier Stephen McWhirter (whose face is visible on the 'Snowflake' poster) after he … Its advertising campaigns should reach out to as many people as possible, and should aim to attract individuals that perhaps until recently would not have believed the British Army was for them. US and Asia subscriptions@prweek.com +001 (800) 558-1708 . In June 2018, the Guardian revealed that the army targeted recruitment material at “stressed and vulnerable” 16-year-olds via social media on and around GCSE results day. The British Army's new 2019 recruitment campaign is targeting snowflake millennials, binge gamers, and selfie addicts and the armed forces continue their drive to attract recruits from unconventional parts of society. Responses include jokes about millennial tropes such as avocado toast. “Not sure why the British army thinks insulting young people is a good recruitment tactic. Army 'snowflake' recruitment campaign mocked on Twitter. MoD issues defence after 'Snowflake' army ad soldier threatens to quit over backlash By Rebecca Stewart - 07 January 2019 11:48am Last week, the British Army's ad … Karmarama's ad campaign for the UK Army has been met with online derision - but there's more to the promos than meets the eye. British MP James Cleverly said people had missed the point of the campaign. The poster designs hark from Lord Kitchener’s ‘Our Country Needs You’ World War One posters.. Some of the poster adverts for the British Army's latest recruitment campaign. Trouble signing in? Digital marketing strategy. These would-be recruits are first shown at home or at work, with others calling out their stereotypes, before the scene suddenly changes and shows them in army roles, ranging from soldiers assisting on humanitarian missions in war-torn villages to providing support in a hurricane relief effort. But according to reports from the Drum, despite the some of the backlash the British Army “Snowflake… The army based the campaign on the historic Your Country Needs You first world war poster featuring Field Marshal Lord Kitchener. The British Army has unveiled its latest recruitment campaign after struggling to get new recruits through the door last year. By Lewis Dormer 12 May, 2019. The TV adverts are complemented by six posters all alluding to crude stereotypes of millennials which suggest those born between the 1980s and 2000s are self-involved, idle, overly sensitive and fixated with social media. Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said: "People are fundamental to the Army. The British Army's This is Belonging campaign aims to fill boots after years of declining numbers. “Stamina,” a voiceover says. The new army recruitment adverts which targeted “ snowflakes, phone zombies, binge gamers, selfie addicts, and me, me, millennials” trapped in … “It shows that time spent in the army equips people with skills for life and provides comradeship, adventure and opportunity like no other job does.”. As the Army tries to recruit "snowflake millennials", how does it compare with previous campaigns? In its latest campaign to get the younger generation to enlist, the British army is appealing to snowflakes & selfie addicts. The British Army has raised eyebrows with its new recruitment campaign, targeting "snowflakes," "phone zombies," and "selfie addicts", among other stereotypical images of millennials. The series of posters, TV adverts and radio spots were designed to show the army looks beyond stereotypes and sees “snowflake” compassion and “phone zombie” focus as strengths. The army’s new campaign targets 16-to-25-year-old “snowflake millennials” who feel they need a “bigger sense of purpose”, according to British army officer Paul Nanson. What an awful campaign,” said one Twitter user. Password. Despite the influx in applications to join, the Army remains critically below its personnel target. The campaign states that the army could use the “compassion” of “snowflakes”, the “self-belief” of millennials, the “confidence” of selfie takers, and the “focus” of phone zombies. Stay signed in. The ads were the centre of a lot of controversy, it received a lot of backlash from people. Nanson said: “The army sees people differently and we are proud to look beyond the stereotypes and spot the potential in young people, from compassion to self-belief.”. The UK army has been heavily criticised for a new recruitment campaign targeted at millennials. Snowflakes we want you! The campaign is targeting 16- to 25-year-olds, part of what is sometimes known as Generation Z. Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines. The camera then focuses on the gamer’s eyes as the advert ends with a throbbing bass synth sound. Recent government statistics have shown that the army numbered only 79,640 out of the required 83,500. Recruitment drive targeted ‘snowflakes, phone zombies, binge gamers, selfie addicts, and me, me, millennials’, Find your bookmarks in your Independent Premium section, under my profile. Please continue to respect all commenters and create constructive debates. Poster for the army recruitment campaign. Responses include jokes about millennial tropes such as avocado toast. 'Snowflakes' wanted: British army rolls out millennial recruitment campaign The ad campaign highlights that the U.K. military spots potential "even if others don't."